Hoot and Holla, the Garden’s resident Barn Owls, are back again and ready for Spring!

Last year, within two days of installing our new owl box, Hoot and Holla moved in–and now they’re back! They didn’t raise a family here last year, but we were very excited to have them in The Garden and can’t wait to see if they start a family here this year.

While living in the owl box last year, Holla (Mom) started a blog. Always faithful, she has picked up where she left off, so look below to read about their days and nights in The Garden!

Shhh, I have five little eggs sleeping under me right now.

Keep watching and you will see them.

Holla's Blog

About Barn Owls

Barn Owls live in open habitats across most of the lower 48 United States and extend into a few parts of southern Canada (as well as in much of the rest of the world). These include grasslands, deserts, marshes, agricultural fields, strips of forest, woodlots, ranchlands, brushy fields, and suburbs and cities.  They fly slowly over open fields at night or dusk with slow wingbeats and a looping, buoyant flight. They use their impressive hearing, aided by their satellite-dish-shaped faces, to locate mice and other rodents in the grass, often in complete darkness.

Barn Owls are usually monogamous and mate for life, although there are some reports of males with more than one mate. After the pair forms, the male brings prey to the female (often more than she can consume), beginning about a month before she starts laying eggs. Barn Owls defend the area around their nests, but don’t defend their hunting sites; more than one pair may hunt on the same fields.

Barn Owls put their nests in holes in trees, cliff ledges and crevices, caves, burrows in river banks, and in many kinds of human structures, including barn lofts, church steeples, houses, nest boxes, haystacks, and even drive-in movie screens. Unlike most birds, owls may use their nest sites for roosting throughout the year. (Info courtesy of allaboutbirds.org).